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Toothsome

I think most of us are experiencing sleep issues during lockdown.  For me, it’s a mix of wakefulness, wild dreams, dozing instead of non REM, sensitivity to the early dawn, and so on.  One aspect is that I wake up, frequently, singing. Many tunes wash through my cerebral cortex, I would love to say that each one is a celestial aria, worthy of the greats, but in fact they are usually monotonous three note riffs which would not occasion any loss of sleep for a Novello nominee. You may experience something similar.

However, I defy anyone to tell me that they also sprang  to wakefulness today at 03:15, singing “Hey, hey!  I’m a bicuspid!” * Takes that dream about all your teeth falling out to a whole new level.

I was laughing so hard I had to decant to the spare room.

*tune available on request.

 

 

 

Notes from my perch

Occasionally my wanderings on the internet surprise even me.  Today I found out that James Dick, a successful business man who was born in Kilmarnock and moved to Glasgow, developed the school gym shoe known by various names over the UK.  He and his brother had experimented with using Gutta-percha to cover the soles of existing shoes.  This extremely useful form of latex, brought over from Malaysia, was responsible for the central Scotland name of gutties, or plimsolls if you were being posh.  I know that when Elspeth went to teach in Gloucestershire, she found out that they were called daps.  My research suggests that the shoes were developed by several manufacturers but our man became a wealthy philanthropist, while an institute in his home town bears his brother’s name.

From Wikipedia:-

The word gutta-percha comes from the plant’s name in Malay: getah translates as ‘latex‘. Percha or perca is an older name for Sumatra.

In other news, the magnificent Elbow continue to release a new live track every Friday at 12 noon, this week it’s Lippy Kids with the backing proved by alumni of Manchester’s Halle Youth Chorus.  The Halle Orchestra is the band’s first choice for string accompaniment etc.  Rosemary recalls going to their concerts when she lived in Longton.

Elbow’s frontman and lyricist Guy Garvey is amongst other things a keen ornithologist, and he would doubtless be the first to spot the link here, which is in Passerines, or perching birds.  Although the birds referred to in Lippy Kids are crows, I feel sure that sparrows are just at the edge of the picture here.

The terms “passerine” and “Passeriformes” are derived from the scientific name of the house sparrow, Passer domesticus, and ultimately from the  Latin passer, which refers to sparrows and similar small birds.

….and if you think all that is convoluted, wait until you hear about last night’s dreams.  Here’s a nice osprey  to make everything better.

https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/trees-woods-and-wildlife/osprey-cam/

Lastly, welcome to the family Leo Thomson, a wee brother for Ellie.

 

 

 

Disembarkadero

My liking for train travel is well documented, I have been reminded of this during lockdown by two separate emails, both from subscriber lists.

The National Railway Museum in York is a fascinating destination for normal times,  I have mentioned before the thrill of sharing the same space as these leviathans of steam power.  I am always delighted to see large reproductions of the classic rail travel posters, deliberately evocative and romantic.  Whilst neither term would describe train travel just now, I was none the less intrigued to see a re-imagination of these artworks, on the Museum’s website.  Sample below gives a flavour of this.

Scotland rail travel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Waterstone’s bookshop (other bookshops are available) came news of a new train travel opus,  which looks like a grand way to escape the current everyday for a few hours.  Review here – no prizes for originality in the article title, but oh, how different it must be from the 07:09 to Edinburgh Waverley.

Around the World in 80 Trains: A 45,000-Mile Adventure (Paperback)
Around the World in 80 Trains: A 45,000-Mile Adventure

100 and 75

Yesterday we had a zoom call with family for Mum’s 100th.  We raised a glass, and had cake.  Elspeth made pancakes.  The commemorative whisky which was my father’s, from the Russian Consulate, was finally broached.  It being the 75th anniversary of VE Day, it was deemed appropriate.

Some of the whisky will be decanted into the Arctic Convoy hip flask, and shared with family once this lockdown business is resolved.

 

Arctic Convoy whisky
100th birthday and VE 75th
Cake

Keepers

In the process of filing away my birthday cards for 2020,  each one is unique and special, thank you to everyone who took the time to draw, paint or send their good wishes.   As I said on the day, this one couldn’t have been more different from the last, but there are very precious memories to be saved.   If I were to upload all the cards I’d be way over my bandwidth for the page, so you’ll just have to come and see them when all this is over.

Mon petit chou

Update 14.05.2020 – Was NO-ONE going to point out the grammatical error in the title?

Biggest surprise of this week though was the delivery of advance vegetables,  in advance that is by about a week of when they were expected.

Nothing daunted*,  I have been farming out chunks of cabbage and leek, with some lovely recipes (and cakes) passed back in exchange.   To date we have had steamed cabbage, pickled cabbage, it’s going in the Scotch Broth, there’s coleslaw en route – and there’s still some left.  One chum has passed me a rumbledethumps recipe, another made turkey, leek & cabbage soup, then bubble and squeak.  The roast cabbage was a total failure and stank out the house for 24 hours.  A bay leaf was added to the steamed version, which successfully contained the odour.   There have been roasted carrots, leek mornay, banana breakfasts and clementine conferences.

Vegetable box

 

 

 

 

 

 

*I think those who had to listen to me squawking about those vegetables would detect the lie here….

Cabbage (Brassica oleracea) from the French caboche – head, Latin caput.

“The time has come,’ the Walrus said,
      To talk of many things:
Of shoes — and ships — and sealing-wax —
      Of cabbages — and kings —
And why the sea is boiling hot —
      And whether pigs have wings.’
Extract from The Walrus and the Carpenter by Lewis Carroll.

Flying Crooked – Poem by Robert Graves

 

The butterfly, the cabbage white,
(His honest idiocy of flight)
Will never now, it is too late,
Master the art of flying straight,
Yet has — who knows so well as I? —
A just sense of how not to fly:
He lurches here and here by guess
And God and hope and hopelessness.
Even the aerobatic swift
Has not his flying-crooked gift.
Robert Graves

Signalling failure

Well, here’s a thing, I thought that the discovery of flat wine bottles was going to be the most amazing find in my week, but no!  Scotrail has come to the rescue of those of us who are missing a daily commute, by posting real time films of various journeys.  Admittedly there’s a difference since it’s been filmed out the back of the cab (not for anyone who can’t sit with their back to the engine) but strangely welcome all the same.  One can either have a journey where it feels like one knows every blade of grass or the rails less travelled.  Apart from the timing and the overcrowding issues, I am a massive fan of rail travel, and this is the longest I have gone in my life without an orange and yellow ticket in my pocket.

 

Zooming in

Zoom 12042020

 

 

 

 

 

All over the world, this is happening.  Talk about silver linings.

Fife, Luxembourg, Belgium,  Edinburgh and London yesterday.  Oh, and Disneyland, thanks Emma.

 

Prime

04:50 a.m., been awake since 02:40, nothing new there and I may manage to go back to sleep yet.  A year ago I had just retired, and was hosting a birthday party in our room at the Kenmore hotel, with Paul, the band, and the folk club.  This one couldn’t be more different but hopefully the weather will be decent and the cake will be edible.

Stay safe.

Stay home.

Be kind.

 

Dunoon

April 2020

Went for my daily walk earlier.   The express bus to Edinburgh (empty except for the driver) passed me by,  and I noticed that it now shows a scrolling message thanking all the key workers.  Walking down a deserted suburban street in early spring, trees in leaf and growing daily, birds shouting for all they’re worth,  sun in the sky and just enough heat in the day to make one think that winter has finally gone,  it’s difficult to relate to the sheer awfulness of what’s taking place.  But the fact that the first thing which crosses my mind on seeing anyone else is, “How quickly can I cross the road?”, or “Can I walk on the grass?” reminds me of the new normal.  Everyone is very keen to acknowledge each other, since social distancing is frightfully un-British and counter intuitive.  If I smile at the person I’ve just literally crossed the road to avoid, that makes it all right, karma wise?

I don’t have any words of wisdom on this one.   I just keep thinking of the old maps where the centres of continents such as Africa were left blank, because no-one in the western world had explored them yet.   Here be dragons.

Thank goodness for all the video calls, they fair cheer me up.