Ironmoulder

Neither my father nor my aunt recalled the name of any foundry in which their father worked.  I have found this detail via Scotland’s People.  See record no. 1920, employee 54.

ScotlandsPeople  (think you have to click twice to see it).

The foundry,  Forth and Clyde and Sunnyside, has an information page here.  It closed the year my Grandpa died, 1963.

As mentioned previously on BTW, he worked in munitions during the Second World War, and did not speak of it. How he coped with the stress of doing that while his son was on active service for six years, I simply do not know.  I think I have mentioned elsewhere that the badge below was given to him, as an essential worker during the First War,  to stop him being challenged by the sort of people who today hide behind a keyboard.

Brass badge worn by people performing essentail non military work inthe first World War
AM munitions worker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other items he made include the boot scraper, now curated by my sister, and a peever*, which sadly we never found.

 

*Peever – small block of iron, used to play Beds, or hopscotch as the the Southerners would have it.  A gird was chalked on the pavement or school playground, and the players had to hop around the grid, kicking the peever forwards in a prescribed manner.

Less fortunate children made do with a tobacco tin filled with earth.  It fills me with delight to see that the kids in our street are still playing this.  Who’s to say an OAP doesn’t have a wee hop herself if it’s early doors?